MARKET OUTLOOK Q3, 2022:

The Case for Growth in the Second Half

The battle between the Bears and the Bulls has been mostly one-sided in 2022, with the S&P 500 and NASDAQ both falling into bear territory in the first half. The stock market’s woes were caused primarily by slowing economic growth, soaring inflation, and rising interest rates, which the serial bears proclaimed were all signs that growth was dead.

But here’s what they’re missing: Growth isn’t dead; earnings are actually accelerating in many industries. And if history repeats, bulls are on the verge of what could be an incredible second-half comeback. In this special report, Navellier & Associates will use historical data examples and reveal five reasons why we believe the stock market could stage a historical comeback in the final months of the year.

Authored by Louis Navellier,
Chief Investment Officer, Navellier & Associates, Inc.

Co-Authored by Bryan Perry, Gary Alexander, Ivan Martchev, and Jason Bodner
Contributors to Navellier & Associates’ weekly Marketmail newsletter

AUGUST 2021

Navellier & Associates, Inc.
One East Liberty, Suite 504
Reno, Nevada 89501
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info@navellier.com
www.navellier.com
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Everyone loves a great comeback story.

Back in 2017 at Super Bowl LI, the New England Patriots faced the Atlanta Falcons in a game that has now earned the title of “the biggest comeback in Super Bowl history.”

The first half was by definition “one-sided.”

The Patriots only scored three points in the first half! And with just over six minutes left in the third quarter, the Falcons were still winning 28-3. The oddsmakers gave the Patriots less than a percentage point chance of winning the game. Clearly, the odds were against them, and Falcons’ fans were celebrating what they thought was a guaranteed victory.

But the Patriots defied the odds. Quarterback Tom Brady threw five-straight scoring drives after halftime, which included two touchdowns, with two-point conversions. The Patriots and the Falcons were tied at the end of the fourth quarter. Overtime.

Well, if you’re a fan of football, you might know what happened next. The Patriots won the coin toss, and after five complete passes from Brady, James White carried the ball two yards into the endzone. The Patriots claimed a 34-28 victory—and grabbed another Super Bowl ring.

As investors, I think we can learn a lot from the Patriots’ comeback in Super Bowl LI.

During the first six months of the year, U.S. economic growth slowed dramatically. The preliminary second-quarter GDP report showed the U.S. economy contracted at a 0.9% annual pace, following up the 1.6% annual contraction in the first quarter. Two-straight quarters of negative GDP growth signals the dreaded R-word… Recession.

Part of the reason for the drop off in economic growth was the surging costs for virtually everything. Prices were already climbing around the world as economies reopened in the wake of the pandemic, but the Russia-Ukraine conflict drove inflation to historically high levels.

Here in the U.S., the Federal Reserve’s favorite inflation indicator, the Personal Consumption Expenditures Price index, increased 6.8% in June and breached its highest level since January 1982.

Long-term Treasury yields also soared in the first half of the year. The 10-year Treasury climbed from 1.63% at the start of 2022 to a high of nearly 3.5% in mid-June. The 10-year Treasury yield currently sits at around 2.8%. Typically, rising Treasury yields trigger falling stock prices—and the bears latched onto this and declared “growth is dead.”

The odds were clearly stacked against the bulls, as the first half of 2022 was “one-sided” with the bears in control of the stock market. The NASDAQ plunged 34% from its November 2021 highs to its mid-June lows1. The S&P 500 dropped 24% from its January highs to its mid-June lows2. A 20% or more decline from recent highs… Bear market.

But, folks, the game is not over.

Persistent institutional buying pressure overpowered the bears in July, with the S&P 500 experiencing its best July since World War II. The index was up more than 9%! I should also add that the NASDAQ reentered bull territory in mid-August.

Clearly, the bulls came out of halftime ready to fight—and if history repeats, the bulls could be on the verge of a stunning second-half comeback.

5 Reasons for a Second Half Comeback

Louis Navellier, here, and in my opinion, growth always wins.

Now, that’s not a popular sentiment these days, with rising interest rates, a more hawkish central bank, slowing economic growth and a stock market still clawing its way back from a bear market. So, rather than just say “trust me,” I’d rather show you why I think growth stocks should have the upper hand in the final months of 2022.

Nothing is guaranteed and the last few years have proved that over and over again.

So we’re going to look at the data, not what we hope will happen in the remainder of 2022.

Numbers do not lie—and the data right now is pointing to the potential for higher stock prices by yearend.

Reason #1 – Strong Quarterly Gains Follow Big Quarterly Losses

When we closed the books on the second quarter, the S&P 500 had experienced its worst first half in more than 50 years. And it wasn’t alone—all of the major indices dropped dramatically in the first six months of the year.

When the market closed on June 303, the S&P 500 was down more than 20%, the Dow had fallen 15%, and the Russell 2000 had dropped nearly 24%. The tech-heavy NASDAQ, though, led the way lower, with nearly a 30% decline in the first six months of the year.

So, if you’ve been looking for good news after the dismal first six months of 2022, here it is:

The folks at Bespoke recently pointed out that the S&P 500 tends to rally strongly after it declines 15% or more in a quarter.

The S&P 500 fell about 17% in the second quarter. In the previous eight instances when the S&P 500 slipped 15%, the index has bounced seven out of eight times in the following quarter and eight out of eight times in the following six months and 12 months. Breaking it down further, the S&P 500 has posted an average 6.22% gain the following quarter, a 15.15% gain in the following six months and a 26.07% gain in the following 12 months.

The even better news is that we’re already starting to see this play out.

The market actually had a positive start to the third quarter—and is well on its way to repeating history with a strong quarterly gain. The S&P 500 just posted its best month since 2020, as the index soared an incredible 9% in July!

Reason #2 – S&P 500 Breaks Above 50-Day Moving Average

Thanks to the rebound in July, the S&P 500 broke its 60-day streak of trading below its 50-day moving average on July 19. Since the end of World War II, the S&P 500 has strung together closes below this level for 50 or more days 31 times. In 10 of these instances, including the most-recent occurrence, the S&P 500 broke the streak with a 2% or more rally.

Why is this important? Well, according to the folks at Bespoke, the stock market rallied strongly in the prior nine instances. In fact, once the streak ended with a 2%+ gain, the S&P 500 went on to post median gains of 3.2% in the following three months, 11.2% gains in the following six months and 20.9% gains in the following 12 months.

Even when you consider all of the 30 previous instances of the S&P 500 ending its more than 50-day streak of closing below its 50-day moving average… the index rallies an average 4.35% in the next six months and 8.93% in the following 12 months.

Since the S&P 500 rose above its 50-day moving average on July 19, the S&P 500 has already rallied nearly 8%4! So, it appears the market is on the right track to follow historical precedence and could end the year with above average gains.

Reason #3 – Market Is Still Oversold and Due for a Bounce

Even with the market’s stunning rebound in July, the “chicken littles” on Wall Street haven’t been afraid to still proclaim that the “sky is falling.” The fact is fear sells—and the financial media does its best to scare folks out of the market. But I hope you can tune out all the negative chatter…

Jason Bodner, who writes Sector Spotlight in the Navellier & Associates weekly Marketmail, recently pointed out that all the stories of red-hot inflation, rising rates, the Russia-Ukraine war and soaring food and energy prices have distorted reality—and the market is now in an oversold position, even with the July rebound. But that might actually signal there is a light at the end of the tunnel.

“As the headlines tout vicious inflation numbers and we all feel it at the pump and grocery store, the fact is that “core” inflation (minus food and energy) is falling. So, the most wicked inflation is mainly isolated to life’s essentials. With higher prices for essential food and energy, that leaves less for discretionary items.
That, in essence, is ghost tightening. Telegraph scary language and let the market do the heavy lifting for you. That’s exactly what I would do if I were running the Fed, because with a $30 trillion national debt, I can’t raise rates too high. That would cripple the economy for far longer than some temporary inflation.

That’s what I think is happening behind the scenes, and that’s what’s behind the headlines of gloom and doom. That’s why I believe that stocks will bounce around a bit in the third quarter before rising again. The Fed will have two more FOMC meetings to raise interest rates and then stop. November’s meeting is right before the election, and the Fed doesn’t want to interfere with elections. By then, we should have solid evidence of slowing inflation, so the Fed will enter a holding pattern. By then, economic data should improve. That sets us up for a big fourth-quarter liftoff, especially for the over-punished growth stocks.

First and foremost, our most powerful indicator has entered oversold territory, which has happened only 22 times since 1990 – and it happened not once but twice this year! The Big Money Index (BMI) went oversold on May 24th and again on July 14th.

Our 32 years of data says that when the BMI hits oversold you should expect a big bounce in stocks.

Simply put, when the BMI goes oversold, the forward returns are nothing short of spectacular. Just look at the average returns:

  • 1 Month returns: +2.7%
  • 3 Months: +5.2%
  • 6 Months: +9.2%
  • 12 Months: +15.3%
  • 24 Months: +29.8%

So, how did we do since the latest occurrence on July 14? The NASDAQ tracking ETF (QQQ) rose 13.2%, and the S&P 500 tracking ETF (SPY) rose 9.8% in under a month, so the oversold BMI strikes again!

But is this a bear squeeze, or the start of a bull run? Moving to our next layer, we start to get a clearer picture. Keep in mind, the BMI is a 25-day moving average of all unusual buying and selling signals. If we look at these signals daily in the chart below, we start to see something interesting. We’re suddenly seeing the most buying we’ve seen all year. This buying started July 27th, and so far, hasn’t looked back:

This starts to frame a picture that institutional and professional investors are legitimately stepping in and adding risk. In fact, when you check in on the 11 S&P sectors, you can see exactly where the money flows are going. Since the buying really started on July 27, nine of the 11 sectors are getting scooped up significantly. That’s solid!

This year, discretionary and tech stocks have been bludgeoned the worst. These sectors haven’t seen hardly any buying, but we’ve recently seen the first significant signs of buying in a long while. If these two sectors on their own were the only ones seeing buying, I would be excited. The engines of any growth market are tech and discretionary companies, so buying in these two areas is encouraging, but it doesn’t stop there.

We’ve also seen recent buy spikes in utilities, industrials, healthcare, and staples, which puts more weight behind the theory of a new bull market forming. But what about the other sectors? While less significant, we still see buying in communications, real estate, and financials.

The only two sectors not seeing significant buying right now are materials and energy. But we can give them a break, because energy has been the strongest sector from the beginning of the year through this summer, and materials also had a strong showing. So, if they are taking a pause while big money flows into the other nine sectors, I’m not particularly concerned.

I’d also like to point out that there has been notable buying in small- and mid-cap stocks. Typically, in a bearish tape, large- and mega-cap shares attract capital because they are viewed as more stable.

Could this be a short squeeze? Sure, I must concede that as a possibility. In fact, I think it’s a given. But that, in and of itself, is a great sign. The market is a forward-thinking machine. I believe the realization is setting in for investors that perhaps the economy and overall situation are not as bad as everyone is making it seem. The case for shorts is dwindling as shorts cover their positions and stock-squeeze value hunters step in thinking there’s an “all clear” to buy. This can build a foundation for a new greed cycle of the market.”

There is a light at the end of the tunnel, folks! As Bodner pointed out, individual and institutional investors have grown more confident and decided it was time to take advantage of the market’s depressed prices in beaten-up industries and sectors. This bargain hunting has created persistent institutional buying pressure that has overpowered the bears on Wall Street recently—and that could be setting us up for a big yearend rally.

In fact, the buying pressure has only intensified in light of recent inflation data…

Reason #4 – Inflation Has Moderated (And Investors Are Finally Cheering!)

Inflation has been a thorn in most investors’ side this year—and one of the primary culprits for the market’s weakness. The reality is the Federal Reserve’s efforts to curb red-hot inflation sent Treasury yields soaring, and it’s no secret that rising rates can pinch some corporation’s profits.

But the latest data showed inflation has moderated since March—and that could inspire the Fed to think twice about even more aggressive interest rate hikes.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) increased 8.5% year-over-year in July, down from 9.1% in June. Economists expected an 8.7% annual pace. Core CPI, which excludes food and energy, rose 0.3% in July and is now up 5.9% year-over-year. That compares to a 0.7% month-to-month rise in June and a 5.9% annual pace. The core figure was also better than expectations for a 6.1% year-over-year increase.

Wholesale inflation also came in much better than anticipated.

The Producer Price Index (PPI) actually dipped 0.5% month-to-month in July, versus expectations for a 0.2% rise. Year-over-year, PPI is up 9.8%, which is also down from the 11.3% annual pace in June and the record-high 11.6% in March. Excluding energy, food and trade services, core PPI rose 0.2% in July and is up 5.8% year-over-year. That’s down from core PPI of 6.4% in June.

Now, both CPI and PPI continue to be driven primarily by soaring energy prices, but even these prices have started to moderate.

In regard to consumer inflation, the energy index dipped in July to show a 32.9% year-over-year increase, compared to June’s 41.6% year-over-year pace. For wholesale inflation, energy declined by 9%. We should continue to see energy prices decline as demand ebbs in the fall.

Clearly, inflation is still hot, but here’s what we need to remember: Core inflation has moderated since its peak back in March. Core CPI peaked at 6.5% in March, and it dipped to a 6% annual pace in May and a 5.9% annual pace in June—and held steady at a 5.9% annual pace in July. Core PPI peaked at 7.1% in March, and it declined to a 6.7% annual pace in May, a 6.4% annual pace in June and a 5.8% annual pace in July.

As long as the core CPI and PPI continue to decline, the Treasury bond rally that has been underway since mid-June should persist. The 10-year Treasury yield has dropped from nearly a 3.5% peak in mid-June to about 2.7% today. The dip has inverted the yield curve, which could prove to be a very positive development for the stock market in the upcoming months.

According to the folks at Bespoke, in the previous 17 times that the three-month to 10-year yield curve flattened by 100 basis points in 50 trading days since 1971, the S&P 500 has rallied in the next three months, six months and 12 months. Breaking it down, the S&P 500 has posted a median gain of 0.27% in three months, a 4.26% median gain in six months and a 16.07% median gain in 12 months.

So, if history repeats, the S&P 500 may essentially tread water until early October and then stage a nice yearend rally that should continue in 2023.

And it is my position and opinion that fundamentally superior stocks will lead the way higher. Let’s look at the data…

Reason #5 – No Earnings Recession in Sight

Are we in a recession? Technically, yes. The preliminary second-quarter GDP report showed the U.S. economy contracted at a 0.9% annual pace, following up the 1.6% annual contraction in the first quarter. As you may know, two-straight quarters of negative GDP growth signals a recession.

Now, it’s important to note that the contraction in the first quarter was due largely to a dramatic 7.5% drop in worker productivity. And the drop in the second quarter was primarily due to a big decline in inventories, as supply and shipping glitches plagued the market. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen commented that the change in private inventories “shaved 2%” off second-quarter GDP. Essentially, Yellen tried to paint a picture of an “inventory recession” versus a “real recession.”

The reality is it’s an odd recession, as unemployment rates remain low—the unemployment rate dipped to 3.5% in July—and corporate earnings are still robust. As a result, I find myself agreeing with Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and President Joe Biden in their conclusion that the U.S. is not in a real recession (unless you’re in the homebuilding business).

Corporate earnings are also not in a recession!

In fact, second-quarter earnings came in much, much better than anticipated. According to FactSet, 75% of S&P 500 companies beat analysts’ earnings estimates for the most-recent quarter. The average earnings surprise is 3.4%, and the S&P 500 achieved 6.7% average earnings growth in the second quarter. To put this into perspective, analysts expected earnings growth of only 4.0% prior to the start of the quarterly earnings season.

Looking forward, earnings momentum will continue, albeit at a slower pace than previous quarters. The S&P 500 is now anticipated to report 8.9% average earnings growth for the year. Breaking it down further, third-quarter earnings are expected to grow 5.8% on average and fourth-quarter earnings are projected to rise 6.1% on average.

But, as we witnessed in the second quarter, S&P 500 companies tend to post big earnings surprises, and actual earnings growth is much higher than analysts’ initial projections. And better-than-expected earnings growth will continue to drop kick and drive fundamentally superior stocks higher in the upcoming months.

So, Can the Bulls Pull Off a Second-Half Win?

When you add it all up, it’s easy to see how the bulls could pull off a late win in the second half of the year. The market put in a firm bottom in mid-June, and history is pointing to higher stock prices by yearend. But it may be a little early to state that we’re in a new bull market, as there’s still plenty of risks that investors need to consider.

But the biggest concern to me is not whether we’re in a recession or not—someone is always predicting a recession or an economic boom. What I find most concerning is that the analyst community has started to trim their estimates for the final two quarters of 2022.

As we discussed earlier, we just experienced a stunning second-quarter earnings announcement season that defied analysts’ expectations. According to FactSet, about 75% of S&P 500 companies topped analysts’ earnings estimates for the latest quarter. But instead of increasing their third- and fourth-quarter outlooks in the wake of stunning second-quarter results, analysts have lowered their outlooks as 58% of S&P 500 companies have issued negative earnings guidance.

Talk about a red flag!

The fact is that you can’t fight the analysts. They’re like a big defensive line that’s everywhere. If you attempt to plow straight through that line, you’ll be tackled before you get anywhere close to the endzone. And, if you’re like me, you don’t want to be tackled; you want to skirt the defensive line.

To do this, you have to go into the second half with a tried-and-true strategy, a growth strategy.

For my money, our best defense is a strong offense of fundamentally superior stocks.

Personally, I’m obsessed with selecting stocks with strong sales and earnings growth, as well as positive analyst revisions. I sell when analysts are trimming estimates, and I buy with both hands when earnings momentum accelerates, and analysts increase estimates.

My fascination with growth stocks started back in the late 1970s during my college years at Cal State Hayward. I wanted to uncover how to beat the market without taking on too much risk—and I believe that a select group of stocks can consistently outperform the S&P 500: stocks with superior fundamentals.

Today, I’m a self-proclaimed “number guys” because the numbers do not lie—and right now, the numbers are telling me that the stock market has plenty of upside potential and fundamentally superior stocks will lead the market higher in the second half.

Overall estimates still call for third-quarter earnings growth of 5.8% and fourth-quarter earnings growth of 6.1%. And for calendar year 2022, the S&P 500 is expected to average 8.9% earnings growth. So, earnings momentum continues—just not in all industries and sectors.

That’s why here at Navellier & Associates, we believe in the power of a well-balanced portfolio.

It can literally neutralize the stock market’s uncertainty and take advantage of unique growth opportunities the market throws our way. That’s why we encourage our clients to take a diversified approach to managing their investments—one that can include growth, income, and capital preservation strategies.

Growth Portfolios

These portfolios feature companies that are committed to growing their sales and earnings. Our growth portfolios are segmented by market capitalization, are actively managed, and seek inefficiently priced growth stocks with opportunities for long-term price appreciation. We screen for small- and large-cap companies that are consistently growing sales and earnings. Our team actively manages this portfolio to find undervalued growth stocks.

Income Portfolios

These offerings provide dividend growth and income opportunities with capital appreciation. At Navellier, our dividend and income portfolios strive for portfolio growth through securities with capital appreciation, strong dividend growth, and income opportunities. We seek out companies that have a history of growing and paying dividends. Most, importantly, these dividend-paying companies have free cash flow to cover each dividend payment. This can it make it much easier to have reliable income in retirement.

Capital Preservation/Defensive Portfolios

These portfolios aim to outperform in up markets and limit losses in declining markets by moving to cash or bonds. This asset allocation plan allows investors to play defense in a declining market. Our capital preservation strategies can help you mitigate steep market losses with defensive ETFs and covered calls. Defensive ETFs can serve this need as they shift to cash or bonds when conditions permit.

When you add up everything we have discussed today, you can quickly see the importance of having a diversified approach to managing your investments—one that can include growth, income, and capital preservation strategies. The power of a well-balanced portfolio cannot be overstated.

When you dive deeper into the details of our exclusive portfolios and strategies, you will see that many of them cross boundaries and can be combined to form an overall portfolio strategy. That portfolio can then be customized to your personal financial goals and risk tolerance.

To build a personal portfolio that strives to deliver returns, it is important to think about things such as your retirement goals, how long you have to reach those goals, and what your risk tolerance is … just to name a few.
At Navellier & Associates, our team is here for you. We will work with you to answer these questions and discuss a customized solution tailored specifically towards you and your retirement goals.

Right now, we have a bullish outlook for the second half of 2022. As we just discussed, history is pointing to higher stocks prices by yearend, but the stock market will narrow as investors grow more selective and focus on stocks with accelerating earnings momentum. We’ve already seen this start to play out, as investors poured into stocks that crushed analysts’ second-quarter earnings estimates and provided positive guidance for the rest of the year.

We can help you build a personal portfolio in the second half. In fact, here’s a sneak peek at how we select stocks for each of our custom portfolio offerings…

Our Proprietary 3-Step Stock Selection Process

At Navellier & Associates, our system was built to find inefficiency in the market, uncover what we think are the market’s best growth stocks, and utilize a disciplined quantitative and fundamental analysis system to create a customized portfolio for individual investors.

Consider an example of the three-step proprietary stock-selection process that we utilize for most portfolios:

  1. Quantitative Analysis: Using our proprietary screening process, we measure reward (alpha) and risk (standard deviation) indicators to the appropriate market capitalization range for each portfolio. We rank stocks based on the reward/risk measure and reduce the initial investment universe to a select bucket of stocks that fall into the upper percentiles of the reward/risk measure.
  2. Fundamental Analysis: We then apply fundamental variable screens to the stocks with the highest reward/risk measures. This shines the spotlight on which companies have exceptional profit margins, excellent earnings growth (and positive earnings surprise potential!) and reasonable price/earnings ratios (based on expected future earnings).
  3. Securities Optimization: We use a proprietary optimization model to maximize alpha, while minimizing portfolio standard deviation. This can efficiently allocate the stocks and create portfolios that are well diversified across sectors and industries.

Primarily, our goal with the three-step stock selection process is to develop portfolios that have a low correlation to their benchmarks, increasing diversification, decreasing risk, and maximizing profits for investors like you.

We’re already over halfway through 2022—and the first six months of the year were tough ones for most investors. But the final months of the year should shape up to be a great ones for all of us here at Navellier. The stock market is narrowing, investors are growing more selective, and growth stocks are returning to favor. So, we believe that now could be a good time for you to have a custom investment strategy that focuses on your financial goals and risk tolerance, as well as diversification.

Navellier & Associates can help you build your own customized portfolio strategy. We rely on our extensive research, trend analysis, customized strategies, and historic market knowledge to manage our client-only portfolios and help our clients take advantage of opportunities that are presented by market corrections—short and long-term—as well as raging bull market situations.

Our proprietary models are built to work on U.S.-based portfolios with a minimum account value of $250,000. If your portfolio meets these criteria, please contact my Navellier & Associates team. They are standing by ready to discuss your personal portfolio and investment strategy to help you make the most of 2022.

Schedule Your Portfolio Review Today

Need some help determining if your portfolio is well-balanced? We can help!

The first step is contacting us to set up a no-obligation portfolio review. This is our opportunity to get to know you a bit more. And don’t worry, there is not a charge for this portfolio review. If you decide you would like Navellier & Associates to manage your portfolio—or one aspect of your portfolio—we will discuss any management fees for that service.

If you decide you’d like to continue to manage things yourself, we hope that we gave you some important information to consider during your portfolio review.

We are not here to simply preach to you, but rather share information that we have gained from our extensive market research and analysis. We also want to know about you so that we can make the right suggestions for your personal situation.

Fill out the form below now to schedule your no-obligation portfolio review.

I’m confident that Navellier & Associates can help guide you to build a portfolio to navigate the current environment and help you achieve your individual financial goals in the second half of 2022.

All the best to you and yours,

Louis Navellier
Chief Investment Officer
Navellier & Associates, Inc. Private Client Group

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About Louis Navellier

My name is Louis Navellier and I’m most widely known as an investment adviser and market analyst. Since 1980, I’ve been publishing my quantitative analysis on growth stocks and I’ve made it my life’s work to continuously refine and develop my analysis for investors like you.

My research and analysis have led to regular appearances on CNBC and Fox Business News and I am frequently quoted by MarketWatch and Bloomberg.

I also manage money for private and institutional clients through my money management company, Navellier & Associates, Inc.

Wealthy individuals and institutional investors want access to my 30+ years of quantitative research experience.

Our work with these professionals requires tight controls on investment risk and an exhaustive due diligence process.

The overall goal for our clients focuses on how we will achieve steady, long-term returns in up and down markets.

At Navellier & Associates, our proprietary quantitative models are designed to balance stocks, mutual funds, and income producing investments to maximize returns while controlling risk.

And today, I’m thrilled to give you the opportunity to put this same rigorous screening criteria and quantitative and fundamental analysis to work for your portfolio. For U.S.-based portfolios from $250,000 to $100+ million — my firm is here to help.

  1. 16057.44 – November 19, 2021 high. 10565.14 – June 16, intraday low.
  2. 4793.54 – Jan 4 high. 3636.87 – June 17, intraday low.
  3. S&P 500: 12/31: 4766.18. 6/30: 3785.38.
    Dow: 12/31: 36338.3. 6/30: 30775.43.
    Russell 2000: 12/31: 2245.31. 6/30: 1707.99.
    NASDAQ: 12/31: 15644.97. 6/30: 11028.74.
  4. July 19 – 3936.69. Aug 11 – 4241.32.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES

Any holdings identified do not represent all of the securities purchased, sold, or recommended for advisory clients and it should not be assumed that investments in securities identified and described were or would be profitable. Performance results presented herein do not necessarily indicate future performance. Results presented include reinvestment of all dividends and other earnings. Investment in equity strategies involves substantial risk and has the potential for partial or complete loss of funds invested. Investment in fixed income components has the potential for the investment return and principal value of an investment to fluctuate so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed, may be worth less than their original cost. It should not be assumed that any securities recommendations made by Navellier & Associates, Inc. in the future will be profitable or equal the performance of securities mentioned in this report.

This report is for informational purposes and is not to be construed as an offer to buy or sell any financial instruments and should not be relied upon as the sole factor in an investment making decision. The views and opinions expressed are those of Navellier at the time of publication and are subject to change. There is no guarantee that these views will come to pass. As with all investments there are associated inherent risks. Please obtain and review all financial material carefully before investing. Although the information in this communication is believed to be materially correct, no representation or warranty is given as to the accuracy of any of the information provided. Certain information included in this communication is based on information obtained from sources considered to be reliable. However, any projections or analysis provided to assist the recipient of this communication in evaluating the matters described herein may be based on subjective assessments and assumptions and may use one among alternative methodologies that produce different results. Accordingly, any projections or analysis should not be viewed as factual and should not be relied upon as an accurate prediction of future results. Furthermore, to the extent permitted by law, neither Navellier nor any of its affiliates, agents, or service providers assumes any liability or responsibility nor owes any duty of care for any consequences of any person acting or refraining to act in reliance on the information contained in this communication or for any decision based on it. Opinions, estimates, and forecasts may be changed without notice. The views and opinions expressed are provided for general information only.

The S&P 500 Index consists of 500 stocks chosen for market size, liquidity and industry group representation. It is a market value weighted index with each stock ’s weight in the index proportionate to its market value. The reported returns reflect a total return for each quarter inclusive of dividends. Presentation of index data does not reflect a belief by Navellier that any stock index constitutes an investment alternative to any Navellier equity strategy presented in these materials, or is necessarily comparable to such strategies and an investor cannot invest directly in an index. Among the most important differences between the indexes and Navellier strategies are that the Navellier equity strategies may (1) incur material management fees, (2) concentrate investments in relatively few ETFs, industries, or sectors, (3) have significantly greater trading activity and related costs, and (4) be significantly more or less volatile than the indexes. All indexes are unmanaged and performance of the indices includes reinvestment of dividends and interest income, unless otherwise noted, are not illustrative of any particular investment and an investment cannot be made in any index.FactSet Disclosure: Navellier does not independently calculate the statistical information included in the attached report. The calculation and the information are provided by FactSet, a company not related to Navellier. Although information contained in the report has been obtained from FactSet and is based on sources Navellier believes to be reliable, Navellier does not guarantee its accuracy, and it may be incomplete or condensed.

The report and the related FactSet sourced information are provided on an “as is” basis. The user assumes the entire risk of any use made of this information. Investors should consider the report as only a single factor in making their investment decision. The report is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the purchase or sale of a security. FactSet sourced information is the exclusive property of FactSet. Without prior written permission of FactSet, this information may not be reproduced, disseminated or used to create any financial products. All indices are unmanaged and performance of the indices include reinvestment of dividends and interest income, unless otherwise noted, are not illustrative of any particular investment and an investment cannot be made in any index. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.

Mapsignals Disclosure: Jason Bodner is a co-founder and co-owner of Mapsignals.com, a Developed Factor Model for isolating outlier stocks using its proprietary quantitative equity selection methodology. Mapsignals was founded in 2014. Data used by Mapsignals, for periods prior to its founding in 2014, is data derived from Factset. Mr. Bodner is an independent contractor who is occasionally hired to write articles and provide his editorial comments and opinions. Mr. Bodner is not employed by Navellier & Associates, Inc., or any other Navellier owned entity. The opinions and statements made in this article are those of Mr. Bodner and not necessarily those of any other persons or entities. Jason Bodner is a co-founder and co-owner of Mapsignals. Mr. Bodner is an independent contractor who is occasionally hired by Navellier & Associates to write an article and or provide opinions for possible use in articles that appear in Navellier & Associates weekly Market Mail. Mr. Bodner is not employed or affiliated with Louis Navellier, Navellier & Associates, Inc., or any other Navellier owned entity. The opinions and statements made here are those of Mr. Bodner and not necessarily those of any other persons or entities. This is not an endorsement, or solicitation or testimonial or investment advice regarding the BMI Index or any statements or recommendations or analysis in the article or the BMI Index or Mapsignals or its products or strategies.

The views and opinions expressed do not constitute specific tax, legal, or investment or financial advice to, or recommendations for, any person, and the material is not intended to provide financial or investment advice and does not take into account the particular financial circumstances of individual investors. Before investing in any investment product, investors should consult their financial or tax advisor, accountant, or attorney with regard to their specific situation.

Please note that Navellier & Associates and the Navellier Private Client Group are managed completely independent of the newsletters owned and published by InvestorPlace Media, LLC and written and edited by Louis Navellier, and investment performance of the newsletters should in no way be considered indicative of potential future investment performance for any Navellier & Associates product.

1. Compliance Statement – Navellier & Associates Inc. claims compliance with the Global investment Performance Standards (GIPS®) and has prepared and presented this report in compliance with the GIPS standards. Navellier & Associates Inc. has been independently verified for the periods January 1, 1995 through December 31, 2020. A firm that claims compliance with the GIPS standards must establish policies and procedures for complying with all the applicable requirements of the GIPS standards. Verification provides assurance on whether the firm’s policies and procedures related to composite and pooled fund maintenance, as well as the calculation, presentation, and distribution of performance, have been designed in compliance with the GIPS standards and have been implemented on a firm-wide basis. The Navellier Large Cap Growth Composite has had a performance examination for the periods September 1, 1998 through December 31, 2020. The verification and performance examination reports are available upon request.”

2. Definition of Firm – Navellier & Associates, Inc. is a registered investment adviser established in 1987. Registration does not imply a certain level of skill or training. Navellier & Associates, Inc. manages a variety of equity assets for primarily U.S. and Canadian institutional and retail clients. The firm’s list of composite descriptions as well as information regarding the firm’s policies for valuing investments, calculating performance, and preparing GIPS reports are available upon request.

3. Composite Description – The composite creation date is March 31, 2005. As of October 1, 2019, the Navellier Large Cap Growth strategy was redefined to include both wrap and institutional accounts to more broadly market the strategy. Prior to this date, only wrap accounts were included in the composite. The Large Cap Growth Composite name changed from the Large Cap Growth Wrap Composite to the Large Cap Growth Composite. The Navellier Large Cap Growth Composite includes all discretionary Large Cap Growth equity accounts that are managed with similar objectives for a full month, including those accounts no longer with the firm. The strategy is designed for aggressive investors seeking capital appreciation from well established companies and seeks to achieve the highest possible returns while controlling risk. The strategy invests in U.S. listed securities with market capitalizations greater than $1 billion. At any given time, the strategy may hold up to 15% in American Depositary Receipts (ADRs). Typically, the strategy invests in approximately 40-50 stocks that pass Navellier’s stringent quantitative and fundamental criteria. Performance figures that are net of fees take into account advisory fees, wrap fees, foreign withholding tax and any brokerage fees or commissions that have been deducted from the account. “Pure” gross-of-fees returns do not reflect the deduction of any trading costs, fees, or expenses, and are presented only as supplemental information. Performance results are total returns and include the reinvestment of all income, including dividends. The composite inception date is September 1, 1998. Valuations and returns are computed and stated in U.S. Dollars.

4. Management Fees – The management fee schedule for accounts ranges from 0.30% to 1.25% of assets under management; however, some incentive fee, fixed fee, and fulcrum fee accounts may be included. Fees are negotiable, and not all accounts included in the composite are charged the same rate. Wrap fee schedules are provided by independent wrap sponsors and are available upon request from the respective wrap sponsor. Wrap fees generally range from 100 to 200 basis points and include custody, trading expenses, and other expenses associated with the management of the account. There are zero commissions accounts included in the composite. The client is referred to the firm’s Form ADV Part 2A for a full disclosure of the fee schedule. Net performance is calculated using actual fees.

5. Composite Dispersion – If applicable, the dispersion of annual returns is measured by the standard deviation across asset-weighted portfolio level gross returns represented within the composite for the full year.

6. Benchmark – The primary benchmark for the composite is the Russell 1000® Growth Index. The Russell 1000® Growth Index measures the performance of those Russell 1000 companies with higher price-to-book ratios and higher forecasted growth values. The secondary benchmark for the composite is the S&P 500 Index, which measures the performance of the 500 leading companies in leading industries of the U.S. economy, focuses on the large cap segment of the market, with approximately 75% coverage of U.S. equities. These indices are considered reasonable measures of the performance of the large cap, growth oriented U.S. companies. The returns for the Russell 1000® Growth and S&P 500 indices include the reinvestment of any dividends. The asset mix of large cap growth equity accounts may not be precisely comparable to the presented indices. Presentation of index data does not reflect a belief by the Firm that the Russell 1000® Growth or S&P 500 indices, or any other index, constitutes an investment alternative to any investment strategy presented in these materials or is necessarily comparable to such strategies.

7. General Disclosure – GIPS® is a registered trademark of CFA Institute. CFA Institute does not endorse or promote this organization, nor does it warrant the accuracy or quality of the content contained herein. The three-year annualized standard deviation measures the variability of the gross composite and the benchmark returns over the preceding 36-month period. Actual results may differ from composite results depending upon the size of the account, custodian related costs, the inception date of the account and other factors. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Investment in equity strategies involves substantial risk and has the potential for partial or complete loss of funds invested. Results presented include reinvestment of all dividends and other earnings. The securities identified and described do not represent all of the securities purchased, sold, or recommended for client accounts. It should not be assumed that any securities recommendations made by Navellier & Associates, Inc. in the future will be profitable or equal the performance of securities made in this report. A list of recommendations made by Navellier & Associates, Inc. for the preceding twelve months is available upon request.

1. Compliance Statement – Navellier & Associates Inc. claims compliance with the Global investment Performance Standards (GIPS®) and has prepared and presented this report in compliance with the GIPS standards. Navellier & Associates Inc. has been independently verified for the periods January 1, 1995 through December 31, 2020. A firm that claims compliance with the GIPS standards must establish policies and procedures for complying with all the applicable requirements of the GIPS standards. Verification provides assurance on whether the firm’s policies and procedures related to composite and pooled fund maintenance, as well as the calculation, presentation, and distribution of performance, have been designed in compliance with the GIPS standards and have been implemented on a firm-wide basis. The Navellier Power Dividend Composite has had a performance examination for the periods January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2020. The verification and performance examination reports are available upon request.”

2. Definition of Firm – Navellier & Associates, Inc. is a registered investment adviser established in 1987. Registration does not imply a certain level of skill or training. Navellier & Associates, Inc. manages a variety of equity assets for primarily U.S. and Canadian institutional and retail clients. The firm’s list of composite descriptions as well as information regarding the firm’s policies for valuing investments, calculating performance, and preparing GIPS reports are available upon request.

3. Composite Description – The composite creation date is March 31, 2006. As of October 1, 2019, the Navellier Power Dividend strategy was redefined to include both wrap and institutional accounts to more broadly market the strategy. Prior to this date, only wrap accounts were included in the composite. The Power Dividend Composite name changed from the Power Dividend Wrap Composite to the Power Dividend Composite. The Navellier Power Dividend Composite includes all discretionary Power Dividend equity accounts and are managed with similar objectives for a full month, including those accounts no longer with the firm. The strategy is designed for aggressive investors seeking to capitalize on the best opportunities within the group of publicly traded companies that pay dividends. The strategy invests in U.S. listed securities with market capitalizations greater than $250 million that pay dividends. Statistical measures may be used in an attempt to identify unusual price movements in individual stock prices, which may result in higher-than-average turnover and cash positions for the portfolio. At any given time, the strategy may hold up to 15% in American Depositary Receipts (ADRs). Stocks in the strategy typically exhibit positive return on equity and positive return on assets, usually have higher free cash flow than what they pay in dividends, and are usually growing dividends faster than the rate of inflation. Typically, the strategy invests in approximately 15 to 30 stocks. The strategy may invest in smaller capitalization stocks that may trade fewer shares than larger capitalization stocks; the liquidity risk among these types of stocks may increase the strategy’s risk. Performance figures that are net of fees take into account advisory fees, wrap fees, foreign withholding tax, and any brokerage fees or commissions that have been deducted from the account. “Pure” gross-of-fees returns do not reflect the deduction of any trading costs, fees, or expenses, and are presented only as supplemental information. Performance results are total returns and include the reinvestment of all income, including dividends. The composite inception date is January 1, 2006. Valuations and returns are computed and stated in U.S. Dollars.

4. Management Fees – The management fee schedule for accounts ranges from 0.30% to 1.25% of assets under management; however, some incentive fee, fixed fee, and fulcrum fee accounts may be included. Wrap fee schedules are provided by independent wrap sponsors and are available upon request from the respective wrap sponsor. Wrap fees generally range from 100 to 200 basis points and include custody, trading expenses, and other expenses associated with the management of the account. There are zero commissions accounts included in the composite. The client is referred to the firm’s Form ADV Part 2A for a full disclosure of the fee schedule. Net performance is calculated using actual fees.5. Composite Dispersion – If applicable, the dispersion of annual returns is measured by the standard deviation across asset-weighted portfolio level gross returns represented within the composite for the full year.

6. Benchmark – The primary benchmark for the composite is the Russell 3000® Index. The Russell 3000® Index measures the performance of the 3,000 largest U.S. companies based on total market capitalization, which represents approximately 98% of the investable U.S. equity market. The secondary benchmark for the composite is the Standard & Poor 500 Index (“S&P 500 Index”). The S&P 500 Index measures the performance of approximately 500 companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges selected by Standard & Poor. These indices are considered reasonable measures of the general performance of the broad U.S. equity market. The returns for the Russell 3000® and S&P 500 indices include the reinvestment of any dividends. The asset mix of Navellier Power Dividend equity accounts may not be precisely comparable to the presented indices. Presentation of index data does not reflect a belief by the Firm that the Russell 3000® or S&P 500 indices, or any other index, constitutes an investment alternative to any investment strategy presented in these materials or is necessarily comparable to such strategies. As of June 2012, the Russell 3000 Index is listed as the primary benchmark because it is a better representation of the investment strategy. The S&P 500 Index has replaced the Russell 1000 Index as the secondary benchmark.

7. General Disclosure – GIPS® is a registered trademark of CFA Institute. CFA Institute does not endorse or promote this organization, nor does it warrant the accuracy or quality of the content contained herein. The three-year annualized standard deviation measures the variability of the gross composite and the benchmark returns over the preceding 36-month period. Actual results may differ from composite results depending upon the size of the account, custodian related costs, the inception date of the account and other factors. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Investment in equity strategies involves substantial risk and has the potential for partial or complete loss of funds invested. Results presented include reinvestment of all dividends and other earnings. The securities identified and described do not represent all of the securities purchased, sold, or recommended for client accounts. It should not be assumed that any securities recommendations made by Navellier & Associates, Inc. in the future will be profitable or equal the performance of securities made in this report. A list of recommendations made by Navellier & Associates, Inc. for the preceding twelve months is available upon request.

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Please note that Navellier & Associates and The Navellier Private Client Group are managed completely independent of the newsletters owned and published by InvestorPlace Media, LLC and written by Louis Navellier, and investment performance of the newsletters should in no way be considered indicative of potential future investment performance for any Navellier & Associates product.

I acknowledge that I have read the Disclosure Language above. Also I give Navellier and Associates, Inc. express written consent to contact me with any offers or promotions via the phone number listed, which may be a cell phone, business line, or residential line (including use of automated dialing equipment and pre-recorded calls). This consent is not a condition of receiving services from Navellier & Associates Inc.

Past performance does not guarantee future results. Investment in equity strategies involves substantial risk and has the potential for partial or complete loss of funds invested. Investment in fixed income components has the potential for the investment return and principal value of an investment to fluctuate so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed, may be worth less than their original cost.

IMPORTANT NEWSLETTER DISCLOSURE: The hypothetical performance results for investment newsletters that are authored or edited by Louis Navellier, including Louis Navellier’s Growth Investor, Louis Navellier’s Breakthrough Stocks, Louis Navellier’s Accelerated Profits, and Louis Navellier’s Platinum Club, are not based on any actual securities trading, portfolio, or accounts, and the newsletters reported hypothetical performances should be considered mere “paper” or proforma hypothetical performance results and are not actual performance of real world trades. Navellier & Associates, Inc. does not have any relation to or affiliation with the owner of these newsletters. There are material differences between Navellier Investment Products’ portfolios and the InvestorPlace Media, LLC newsletter portfolios authored by Louis Navellier. The InvestorPlace Media, LLC newsletters contain hypothetical performance that do not include transaction costs, advisory fees, or other fees a client might incur if actual investments and trades were being made by an investor. As a result, newsletter performance should not be used to evaluate Navellier Investment services which are separate and different from the newsletters. The owner of the newsletters is InvestorPlace Media, LLC and any questions concerning the newsletters, including any newsletter advertising or hypothetical Newsletter performance claims, (which are calculated solely by Investor Place Media and not Navellier) should be referred to InvestorPlace Media, LLC at (800) 718-8289.